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Add these 5 Core Exercises to Your Triathlon Training Plan

Triathletes: don’t skip these 5 core exercises

Core exercises are a crucial addition to a triathlete’s training plan. A weak core is detrimental to overall performance. The core represents the muscle groups in the mid-section of your body. These muscles are used to create and transfer force, stabilize the spine, and assist most major movements. The most important advantage of core training is that it doesn’t take much extra time, yet produces substantial results. These 5 core exercises can be done before, during, or after your workout. You could even build them into your rest days. Download the helpful PDF below for a visual reminder of each core exercise. Pro tip: knock them out during your lunch break with these other quick workouts.

Plank and kick

You can plank and kick anywhere!

Planks are good, but adding dynamic movement can strengthen your abdominal muscles. Start in a normal plank on your elbows or hands. Now alternate lifting your legs, 10-15 times each, in the air. Plank exercises help strengthen upper body muscles as well.

Flutter kicks

These are simple core exercises that’ll improve your mid-section and legs. Add these to a circuit workout or before or after your next ride or run. Lie on your back and place your hands behind your head or by your side flat on the ground. Alternate kick your legs slowly, raising them no more than 6 inches off the ground. Keep them straight and don’t let them touch the ground. Do at least 15 for each leg. These will work your leg muscles and abs at the same time.

Side plank rotation

Hold a plank with your elbows in a sideways position, poking out. Bring your right knee to meet your left elbow. Repeat 15 times for each leg/elbow. The side plank rotation is good for increasing strength in your lower back and legs. Add the side plank rotation to these dryland exercises to improve your swim when you can’t get in the water.

Single-leg crunch

These core exercises helps cyclists because it works the lower back, transverse abdomen, and obliques. Lie on a mat face up, extend your left leg out. Bend your right knee, put your right foot flat on the floor, squeeze your belly button toward your spine. Raise your upper back off the mat, lift your left leg, reach your left fingers towards your left toes. Keep your lower back on the mat. Repeat with each side 15 times.

Glute bridge

Strengthening your glutes can reduce the burden on your back and help prevent lower-body injuries. The glute bridge also helps you maintain good cycling and running form. Lie on your back, bend your knees at a 45-degree angle. Place your feet flat on the floor and raise your arms. Press your back to the ground. Contract your glutes and push down with your heels. Now raise your hips to knee height. Repeat 15 times.

A strong core is the best-kept secret for optimal triathlete performance. Core exercises can prevent injury throughout the body and help stabilize your balance. These 5 core exercises don’t take much time, making them easy to add to any triathlon training plan. You could even build them into your workout’s warm-up and cool down.

Triathlon Training After 40: What You Need to Know

Age is just a number; of course you can start triathlon training after 40!

Triathlon involves mastering three sports – swimming, cycling, and running. This makes many people over the age of 40 think that triathlon isn’t for them. But that line of thinking just isn’t true. Triathlon training after 40 is possible and you can do it!

Don’t wait any longer, start your training today with an easy run.

How you train changes as you age. If you’re 40 years or older, then you need to pick a training plan that meets your needs. Focus on strength and endurance training. That’ll give you the foundation you need to get started on your triathlon journey. Many of the world’s top triathletes are over the age of 40. This proves triathlon training after 40 is possible. Below is everything you need to know to jumpstart your training today!

You can complete a triathlon at any time, especially if you start training after 40

The first thing you need to do is to visualize your end result: crossing the finish line. Visualize yourself doing that. This helps remind yourself that you can finish a triathlon. More importantly, it helps you to establish a long-term goal. When you know what you’re long-term goals are, you can set short-term goals that’ll help you get there. Next, choose a particular finish line, like CapTex Triathlon’s downtown Austin one, and register. You have to make the goal a real one. Registering for a triathlon gives you that goal. Now you can incorporate the advice below and begin triathlon training after 40.

  1. Start today

Training is the first step in helping you reach your goals. Instead of using excuses for why you shouldn’t train, find reasons why you should begin. This will help you get the ball rolling and help you follow your plan. When you’re starting out you don’t have to run ten miles the first day.

Wake up earlier and knock your goals out in the morning.

Start small, with a 2-mile run. Tomorrow you can ride your bike for 45 minutes. Next, add in swimming an amount of time that’s comfortable for you. The amounts are up to you, but you have to start. You’ll eventually increase your time and distance. Getting your body used to the training process is a core part of your training, especially if you’re a beginner. Add to your preparation when you know what to expect at your first triathlon.

  1. Follow your training plan

As people age, their muscle mass and bone density become lower than when they were younger. This means that you need to focus on building your strength and endurance if you start triathlon training after 40. Creating and following your training plan helps inform you of what you need to do every day. You’ll gain the motivation you need as well. A triathlon training plan also helps you track your progress. Pro tip: get over your fear of open-water swimming with these 5 tips.

  1. Wake up earlier

Cycling to work is a great workout.

As someone who is training after 40, you may feel as if you don’t have enough time. This isn’t true. There’s plenty of time, you just have to adjust your schedule. For example, wake up one hour earlier for the first few months of training. Now you’ve finished your workout before work. 

Your life is busy with family and friends, work, and hobbies. It’s possible to incorporate training into your everyday life and not sacrifice any of that when you begin training after 40. Cycle to work instead of driving. Knock out your training, increase your bike mileage, and reduce your carbon footprint. Go for runs near your house. Find a swimming pool nearby so you can swim. Finding ways to increase the chance you work out helps you be consistent with your training.

  1. Use the gear you have

When you start training, you may already have the 6 items every beginner triathlete must have. This list includes running shoes, swimming trunks, and a road/mountain bike. Maybe you’ve seen or heard about expensive equipment that can improve your time. You don’t need that in the beginning. Work with what you have so you can begin your triathlon training as soon as possible. As you continue to train, you can slowly upgrade your gear with new equipment.

  1. Join a triathlon group

There are many benefits to joining a triathlon group.

Definitely join a triathlon training group near you. They’ll have veteran triathletes who can offer you great advice like how you can tell if you’re dehydrated. Triathlon training groups also act as a strong motivating force and might have a beginner group you can train with. They also might offer information on training plans, nutrition/hydration advice, and beneficial discounts. Those discounts could help you save money. Most importantly, you’ll be surrounded by like-minded people who can act as a strong motivating force.

Triathlon training after 40 is a rewarding experience. You’ll try something new and improve your health. Who knows, you just might meet your goals this year! Remember, age is just a number. Learn how this Rookie Triathlon Ambassador began training at the young age of 52!

4 Signs Dehydration is Affecting Your Performance

These 4 signs can mean dehydration is affecting your performance

As a triathlete, you want to push harder every training session to ensure you can give your best performance on race day. However, in this pursuit of improvement, a common issue you might encounter is dehydration. How do you know when you’re suffering from dehydration? Watch for these 4 signs of dehydration and keep it from affecting your performance. Pro tip: if you experience any of the 4 signs of dehydration, stop what you’re doing immediately, find shade, and hydrate.

1. Body overheating

If your body begins to overheat, stop immediately.

During your triathlon training, you need to monitor your body’s ability to cool itself. Dehydration increases the thickness of your blood while reducing its volume simultaneously. As a result, your skin won’t be able to dissipate the heat generated during your training session. Not only does this overheat your body, but you’ll find it harder to continue pushing yourself to your limits. Pro tip: these habits of successful triathletes are beneficial to any training plan.

2. Dizziness and headaches

Signs you’re dehydrated include blurry vision, headaches, and dizziness.

Dehydration during triathlon training can have an adverse impact on your well-being if you don’t pay attention to your body. Signs you might be dehydrated include blurry vision, dizziness, headaches, and light-headedness. Due to overheating, you could experience chills, even if you train in a hot environment. This will increase your skin sensitivity and cause goosebumps. If you do live in a warmer climate, follow these tips to beat the heat.

3. Muscle cramps

Muscle cramps can indicate dehydration.

The intensity of training and dehydration can put immense stress on your body, especially when you’re increasing your bike mileage. Sweating and extensive training on a daily basis increases how much sodium and fluid you lose. Sodium is essential as it is in charge of nerve impulse transmission, cognitive function, muscle contraction, and nutrient absorption in your gut. Lack of sodium affects your calorie intake while also causing your muscles to cramp. 

4. Decrease in cardiovascular function

Due to the effects of dehydration, your heart won’t be able to pump the same amount of blood as it normally does. If you continue training under this condition, there will be a drop in your cardiovascular function. Your heart won’t be able to pump enough fresh blood to your muscles.

It’s imperative that you pay attention to your body during training. The more time spent training, the more you should hydrate beforehand and during. Check out these different ways to carry hydration during your runs. If you hydrate regularly on a daily basis, you can avoid many of these symptoms. Always make sure you replenish the fluids you lose while sweating, especially electrolytes. Remember, if you experience any of the 4 signs of dehydration, stop what you’re doing immediately, find shade, and hydrate.

Train Your Brain: Build Mental Toughness

Build mental toughness and explore what you’re capable of accomplishing

It’s easy to get wrapped up in the latest gear and training technology. Triathletes get caught up in the latest nutrition, the newest GPS watch, or the most recent bike to hit the market. But can those get you over the proverbial hump? Maybe not. Most agree that a big part of success in any sport is due to mental factors. You can have the fanciest items, but they can’t make you push yourself when it’s needed most. When you build mental toughness you create strategies for when an obstacle is encountered or an uncomfortable feeling arises. Those strategies become tools that help you become comfortable with the uncomfortable. Still uncomfortable during an open water swim? Add these 5 tips to get over your fear of open water to your strategy.

How you can build mental toughness

Assume that your thoughts, feelings, and performance are intertwined. With that, triathletes can begin the process of overcoming anything rather than the feeling of being overcome. Mental training is an important part of an athlete’s overall development. Many do not identify this part of training and often find themselves struggling during their training or a race. One of the basic principles of success and how to build mental toughness is to simplify the process of thinking. Be as prepared for your first triathlon as possible when you know what to expect with this breakdown.

You can accomplish anything you set out to do!

As many will confirm, you can accomplish anything you put your mind to. With so many thoughts going through the brain, it can be difficult to reduce distractions and negatives. One of the reasons why athletes ignore the mental aspect of training is that they are not familiar with the basics of sports psychology and mental training. In keeping with the “less is better” philosophy, mental training is better understood using the construction of the following three words: Think –> Feel–> Perform.

Think

Check-in with yourself before your next swim, bike, or run workout.

Before your next workout, take a moment to identify your thoughts. Are you optimistic about your planned bike ride? Are you thinking about how good you will feel during and after the swim? Maintaining positive thoughts before and during an activity is the first step to controlling your performance. Uncomfortable and negative thoughts might start to creep in. Bring yourself back to your “why” and tell yourself positive “I am” statements. Make these “I am” statements become a habit. Then add that to these 8 additional habits of successful triathletes.

  • I am strong.
  • I am willing to push through this to complete my goal of riding 30 miles.
  • I can swim longer.
  • I am running 10 miles to better myself.  

Feel

Determine your emotional state as you warm up. Identify your thoughts. Are you excited to swim, bike, or run? Do you feel a personal challenge with the distance? Do you feel confident in your abilities? Are you anxious, nervous, or stressed about the mileage? Maintaining positive emotions before and during the workout is the second step in gaining control over your performance. Pro tip: feel more confident when you increase your bike mileage by incorporating these 6 tips.

Consistency is key during training.

Visualize other times in your life or training where you have achieved a goal you set for yourself. Harness this positive feeling and project it towards your current goal. Check your playlist if you are listening to music. Make sure your running playlist consists of music that’ll pump you up and energize you. If more relaxed music or a podcast helps, listen to that to calm your nerves. 

Perform

Practice daily. Be consistent. This does not mean you have to work out every day, but you can put yourself in situations where you have to practice mental toughness. Increase the weights during your workout or add more reps. Add more miles to your ride. Swim for 15 more minutes than last time. If you need to make tweaks to your training to see improvement, follow this advice and adjust accordingly.

Introduce yourself to situations that may happen on race day during your training. Get out of bed and start that workout in the cold weather. Next time it is raining, instead of skipping go out and run in the rain. Of course, that is only if it is safe to do so. Didn’t sleep well? Attempt your planned run. You can see how the lack of sleep affects your ability to keep positive thoughts and emotions. 

Overcome the struggle

Having positive thoughts and feelings right from the start will give you a chance to succeed. This may not result in PR, but you are in a much better position to have a pleasant experience with the right mindset. Your thoughts can affect your emotions, and your emotions can affect your performance. Once you get into the race, a strong swim will lead to more positive thoughts, more confident emotions. Conversely, negative thoughts usually lead to negative feelings.

If you find yourself struggling, understand your thought process during that specific workout. Chances are negative, self-defeating thoughts are what’s making you question your abilities. Turn your thoughts into something positive, optimistic, and confidence-building. When you go out on the streets, it will help you feel good about yourself and crush your next swim, bike, or run.

How Many Calories are Burned During a Sprint Triathlon?

Understand your body’s needs when you know how many calories are burned during a sprint triathlon

Triathlon is among the most physically demanding and grueling sports. The race is divided into three parts – cycling, swimming, and running. Sprint triathlon is the shortest of all triathlon distances and a great way for new triathletes to enter the sport. CapTex Triathlon’s sprint distance includes a 750m swim, 12.3-mile bike ride, and 5K run. Those are also typical of other sprint distances. While sprint distances are shorter, you still have to properly fuel your body. Proper nutrition is important no matter the distance. In order to know what your body needs, you have to understand how many calories are burned during a sprint triathlon.

Keep in mind that everyone burns calories at different rates. This is meant to be a general guide to understanding your needs. Here’s some more helpful information on what to expect at your first triathlon.

Pro tip: this information can be useful if you’re participating in The Rookie Triathlon’s super sprint distance. It consists of a 300m swim 11-mile ride, and 2-mile run.

Calories burned

For triathletes, several factors play a role in how many calories are burned during a race. The three biggest contributors are bodyweight, distance covered, and pace during the event. The majority of charts will have a ‘calories burned’ per time segment/per round, keeping in mind your body weight. The calorie values typically include the individual’s basal metabolic rate (BMR).

For a 750m swim, a person weighing 150 pounds would burn approximately 682 calories each hour. The sprint typically takes up to 20 minutes, so the total would be around 85 to 227.

It takes about 38 minutes to complete the 12.3-mile bike ride. For a person that weighs 150 pounds, the calories burned covering this distance would be around 682. A person weighing 120 pounds would burn around 545. Pro tip: safely practice eating and drinking on the bike and avoid traffic at these 3 cyclist-friendly Austin locations.

A 5K run usually takes 45 minutes for an average triathlete to complete. When you run at this particular pace, you burn up to 15 calories a minute. This equates to approximately 675 calories. That amount could increase for triathletes that run faster.

Things to keep in mind

If this is your first time training for a triathlon, you might notice a rise in your regular appetite. This will typically happen in the first few weeks of training and workouts. Why does this happen? An increase in appetite results from the body burning a greater number of calories than normal. However, when you’re training for your sprint triathlon make sure you don’t overeat. This will undo the benefits of your daily workouts. There are workout calculators that you can use to track the number of calories burned and monitor your calorie consumption. These aspects are critical for maintaining your weight goals. Additionally, practice these habits of successful triathletes to crush your training and hit your goals!

Easy Workouts You Can Do During Your Lunch Break

Pressed for time? Crush these lunch break workouts

One of the biggest struggles for working professionals is striking that work-life balance. While there are hundreds of suggestions available online to help you achieve this work-life balance, it is easier said than done. Most people tend to spend their time sitting in one place with limited physical activity. We tend to invest all our time in our work, trying to maximize our productivity, taking our body for granted. One cannot neglect the need for the physical conditioning of the body in such a scenario. Regular exercise and workouts are essential to ensuring a fit and productive body. Time is valuable. If you can incorporate these lunch break workouts, do it!

Go for a quick jog during lunch.

Over-loaded schedules can lead to burn out, fatigue, and missed workouts. Working out regularly has numerous benefits. Consistency is crucial if training for a triathlon of any distance. Missing even one day can sometimes upset your body’s schedule and disrupt its normal functioning. We have compiled a list of easy lunch break workouts that won’t take up all of your time. Stay on track, whether you’re training or staying in shape.

Go for a quick jog or ride

You can develop this habit and feel the difference within a few days. A light jog or a quick ride is something you can do just about anywhere. If you have lunch in your office, you can take a lap around the office. You can even ask your colleagues to join you and form an office run club. If you decide to eat at a nearby place, you can ride there. Pro tip: if you have the chance to take the stairs, do it! You can also turn that into a workout. Walk or jog up and down several floors. This will help increase your lower body strength.

Light jogging or an easy ride can work wonders before lunch. It will increase your heart rate, ensuring a proper flow of blood throughout your body. It is basically a cardio blast before lunch, and we promise you will enjoy your lunch better after it. These 3 cyclist-friendly routes in Austin are great for a quick ride.

Circuit training

No weights? No problem! Push-ups, sit-ups, and squats will get the job done.

If you are not at your office and can afford a little sweat, try circuit training. You can develop a quick customized routine to suit your physical requirements. It can be a combination of multiple two-minute routines, focusing on every major muscle, or it can just focus on a core group of muscles.

If you’re trying to save money during triathlon training, you can even do this at the office without weights. You will use your bodyweight for push-ups, sit-ups, squats, and lunges. Set up a workout plan with three sets of 10 repetitions. No matter your workout’s intensity, don’t forget about the importance of the warm-up and cool down.

Develop a quick stretch routine

The benefits of stretching every day are endless.

This is again something you can take up anywhere. Once you realize it’s time for lunch, you can take off your shoes and stretch your muscles. Make sure that you focus on every major muscle: shoulders, arms, legs, torso, and neck. Once you develop a flow, you can add more stretching exercises to your routine or incorporate a 15-minute yoga session. A great stretch routine is an important part of any day, but especially if you use your lunch break workouts as training for your first triathlon.

What to Expect at Your First Triathlon

Be prepared for everything and know what to expect at your first triathlon

Have you signed up for your first triathlon? Congrats! You might have questions about training, what you need, and what will happen on race day. We’ll walk you through race weekend, from packet pickup to the finish line festival. For a breakdown of what you need, make sure you have these 6 items. There are many variations of training plans available. Whatever route you go, incorporate these 8 habits to have a good training experience.

Know what to expect for a memorable journey to the finish line.

Beginner triathletes can feel excitement, stress, and anxiety all at the same time. Like your upcoming training, the more you know the better. Keep the surprises to a minimum and soothe those jitters with this rundown of what to expect at your first triathlon. Unless you have a specific time goal in mind with certain splits, make this an enjoyable experience and have fun. Pro tip: there’s nothing better than reading a story about someone’s first triathlon, especially when it’s written by the new triathlete. Read about William’s first triathlon and see how his day went!

Before the start line

Packet pickup

You need to pick up your race packet! It’ll have important items like your timing chip, swim cap, and bib. You might find other goodies like a commemorative shirt and items or discounts from sponsors. Packet pickup normally takes place at least one day before the race. Some triathlons have expos full of vendors, gear, and experiences. Other events might set up shop at a local bike shop. Either way, get your packet before race day. Pro tip: packet pickup is typically busiest during the first two hours. Consider going a couple hours after it has opened.

Transition

Get to transition early so you can take your time setting up your area.

If this is your first triathlon, you might want to get to transition as soon as it opens race morning. This can provide you with an advantage. Pick out the location that’s best for you based on where your age group is located. Set up your transition so that it best fits your race-day needs. If you get set up and have plenty of time, walk around transition, chat with other triathletes, and become familiar with where your items are located. The last thing you want is to exit the water, run to transition, and forget where your bike is. Eliminate any other pre-race jitters with these 6 tactics.

After the start line

Swim

Out of the water, headed to transition.

Participants are grouped by their age. You’ll begin the swim in wave with your group. As a beginner, ease into the swim and build momentum once you get in a rhythm. Focus on your form and rely on your training. If you used certain tricks to keep you calm, implement them when needed. Make sure you look up and stay on course. You don’t want to swim any more than you have to! Once you complete the swim and exit the water, unzip and take off your wetsuit if you wore one. Head to transition, locate your bike, and switch out any swim gear for what you’ll need on the bike.

Bike

Check your bike a few days prior to the race to ensure everything is good to go. You want to avoid any last-minute hiccups. Check your brakes, chain, wheels, and see if your saddle height needs to be adjusted. The adrenaline from the swim will make you want to exert all your energy on the bike, but remember to save something for the run. Once you’re ready to go, make sure your helmet is on and the helmet strap is secure before leaving transition with your bike. You can’t get on your bike until you cross the mount line. When you return, you have to get off your bike at or before the dismount line. Head back to your spot, rack your bike, grab your bib, and get ready to run

Run

Crossing the finish line is something you’ll always remember!

Well done! You made it to the final leg of your first triathlon. You will need a minute to recover from the bike and get your legs going. If you completed any brick workouts during your training then you’ll know your legs will feel wobbly when you dismount your bike. The run leg will test your stamina and patience. You’re exhausted and toward the end of your first triathlon. Focus on your breathing and keep putting one foot in front of the other. Grab hydration along the run if you need it. Keep pushing, you’ll cross the finish line soon!

Finishing your first triathlon will be a moment you remember forever. A certain euphoria will take over and make all the stress, pain, and fatigue worth it. Give yourself a pat on the back and head to the finish line festival to celebrate your accomplishment.

10 Fun Facts You Need to Know About Triathlon

10 Fun Facts You Never Knew About the Sport of Triathlon!

Triathlon is a complex sport that consists of swimming, biking, and running. While there is a lot of technical aspects to know about triathlon, there’s a lot of fun stuff too! We love everything there is about triathlon. From selecting the race and choosing the right distance, to the preparation and training. Trying to take all that in can be overwhelming, so let’s start with some of the fun stuff. Expand your knowledge of triathlon and keep reading to see 10 fun facts about triathlon you maybe didn’t know!

Check Out These Fun Facts

  1. It is not uncommon for triathletes to burn up to 10,000 calories during a long-distance race. 
  2. In triathlon every second counts, for that reason, many athletes pee while they are on the bike, or even on the run. 
  3. The first triathlon event was held on September 25, 1974. 
  4. Simon Lessings holds the Olympic distance triathlon world record with a time of 1 hour, 39 minutes, 50 seconds. That’s fast. 
  5. Triathlon was designed to be an alternative to hard track training.
  6. The reason why the order of the disciplines is swim, bike, run is for safety concerns. 
  7. The Olympic distance tri was originally called the international distance. 
  8. The oldest triathlete on record is Arthur Gilbert, who was still competing at the age of 93. 
  9. Drafting, riding in close behind the rider before you to reduce wind resistance, is not allowed during the cycling part of a triathlon. If you get caught you face a penalty including disqualification. 
  10. Triathlon made its Olympic debut at the 2000 Sydney Games.

The world of triathlon is certainly an interesting one and has evolved greatly overtime with new people joining the fun each year. If you’re new to the sport and thinking about doing a triathlon yourself, check out these essential race day tips to help as you train and prepare for your first triathlon. Now that you know some of the fun triathlon facts, be sure to share it with your fellow triathletes on Facebook or Twitter.

6 Things to Keep In Mind for Olympic Distance Triathlons

Going The Distance: What to Keep In Mind When Going From Sprint to Olympic

So you have completed a Sprint Triathlon and now you’re looking for the next challenge. You can always do more sprint triathlons and work on increasing your speed or you can work on your endurance and increase your distance. Maybe going up to the next distance is your goal. For those looking to go long, here are some simple training reminders and workout tips to help you conquer the Olympic distance tri at CapTex Tri.

6 Tips for Olympic Distance Triathlons

1. Not Always Easy

First, it is important to remember that part of the appeal of racing an Olympic distance is that it is not exactly easy.  Simply doubling your workouts isn’t going to cut it. In training, have a goal of completing 60-80% of the segment distance before the event. 

2. Find Your Pace

With a sprint, you could go all out but you will probably not able to keep this same pace in the Olympic distance tri. Train at a pace that you are comfortable with so that you do not burn out on race day. Start thinking of speed versus endurance.

3. Calories Matter

Third, Calories Calories Calories. These longer distances are going to require fueling. Test several products before committing, just because something works for your friend or someone at the gym, it doesn’t mean that it is right for you.

4. Preparation is Key

Fourth, take “Nothing New on Race Day” to the next level. Make sure you have tried everything at least 3 times before you arrive race morning. We are talking socks, shoes, hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, nutrition, which water bottle, ev-er-y-thing. 

5. When in Doubt, Swim

Fifth, if you have time for an extra workout – choose the pool. Swimming is great aerobics and can lead to gains on the bike and the run. Efficiency in the swim can leave you with more energy instead of being taxed right out of the water. More important than hours logged, make sure that you are making each workout count.

6. Find A Balance

Sixth, keep balance. Make sure to find time for friends and family. Many of them may not understand but make sure and thank them for being there to support you in any way. Make sure and inform them when, where, and how long you are going out for a long run or bike. A safety post on Facebook is a good idea as well and a fun way to let everyone know how your training is going. 

6 tips for going from sprint to olympic distance triathlonAdditional Tips

  • Every other week make one of your run workouts follows immediately after your bike workout. 
  • Switch it up. Don’t always do the same style work out on the same day of the week.
  • Have Fun and Smile!

 

Go The Distance!

These 6 easy steps are your guide to getting to the start line with a high level of confidence so that you are ready to be successful for your first Olympic distance triathlon! Also, remember that no matter the distance increase it is important to keep your ultimate end goal in mind and then set up milestones that you can meet along the way.

Importance of Warming Up and Cooling Down

Warm-Up and Cool Down: The Basics

We know that each workout should start with a warm-up and end with a cool-down, but more often than not, athletes tend to skip one or both. Especially when pressed for time. Not incorporating a warm-up and cool-down into your training can be detrimental to your overall performance when it comes time for race day. While also puts you at the disadvantage of a much higher risk of injury. Just like giving your car time to warm up before cruising at 65 mph, your body needs this time to get in a higher gear for more intense workouts or fitness activities. Keep reading to know the importance of warming up and cooling down during your CapTex Tri training.

Why You Should Warm-Up

A warm-up before a training session or race is essential for preparing your body and mind for a workout session. The main point of a warm-up is to increase your body core temperature and muscles. Warming up will not only help you to perform better, but it will also protect your body from injury. A good warm-up gets your blood flowing and gives you a chance to get energized for the rest of your session. It also helps increase the range of motion to your joints and muscles, which should allow your muscles to feel less stressed and stiff when you start. A dynamic warmup should aim to increase blood flow to the areas which will be working and to wake up the nervous system throughout the body.

A guideline to a general warm-up routine would include:

Jogging, biking, etc. for about 5 minutes to just get your blood flowing and get those muscles and joints moving. You want to work at a comfortable pace that’s easy to moderate. For the bike, a good warm-up should consist of five to 10 minutes of easy spinning, and then slowly increasing to the gear you wish to complete your session in. This really helps “open up” your body before getting into the more strenuous part of your workout.

Why You Should Cool-Down

Don’t come to an abrupt stop when completing your exercise, especially if it has been high intensity. Instead, you should cool-down by exercising at a lower intensity than the main session to bring your body temp and heart rate back down to pre-exercise levels. The cool-down should last around five to 10 minutes no matter what discipline you are training for that day. Cooling down helps to gradually decrease your heart rate and get rid of the metabolic waste from your muscles.
Mentally, cooling down also allows you some space to reflect on your performance and gives you some time to set you up for the rest of the day. Don’t underestimate the importance of this! Pro tip: Add some stretches to your cool down while your muscles are warmed up for one of the best ways to improve your overall flexibility and mobility while also reducing post-workout pain.

Bottom Line

Group Warming Up and Cooling DownAdding a warm-up and cool down into your fitness routine is a simple, yet proven way to maximize your benefits when working out. The warm-up gives your body a chance to prepare for your session while the cool-down then helps you focus on slowing your breathing and return to your normal heart rate. Rather than seeing it as an optional part of your workout, think of warming up and cooling down as part of your session to get the most out of all the hard work you’ve put in!