A cyclist adjusts the saddle height on his bike. Text on design reads Adjusting Your Saddle Height. Learn more at https://captextri.com/adjusting-your-saddle-height/

Adjusting Your Saddle Height Can Make All the Difference

Learn why adjusting your saddle height matters and how it can be done

Many people don’t realize that adjusting your saddle height by a few millimeters can make a huge difference in how they feel on their bike. If you feel like you are not making gains or if you have pain after riding, you may want to try adjusting your saddle height. Properly adjusting your saddle height could help you improve these 5 bike handling skills.

Saddle height explained

Saddle height is the distance between the heart of the pedal axle and the top of the saddle. It is set by adjusting the seat post to an ideal height that balances comfort and power on the bike. Remember, adjusting your saddle height is important like making sure your helmet always fits!

Reasons to change

Saddle height is arguably the single most important adjustment on your bicycle. Incorrect saddle height can contribute to saddle discomfort and anterior and posterior knee pain. The poor leverage can also limit your power production. 

Adjusting your saddle height

There are many methods and formulas to find your “proper” saddle height. One of the best approaches is to establish it based on the rider’s individual ride characteristics and flexibility. If you are looking for recommendations, visit Josh at Jack & Adam’s Fredericksburg or with the crew over at Mellow Johnny’s. A bike fit specialist can explain your individual characteristics. They can also highlight what equipment may be contributing to any performance or biomechanical limitations. If you can’t make it to a bike fit there is still a solution. 

At home fix

Before your next ride, experiment at home with the “heel to pedal method.” This will get you in the ballpark range before you can see a professional. First, mark the current height. Then, put your bike on the trainer. Pedal around to make sure you are in the position you normally ride in. Place your heel on the pedal and pedal backward to reach the six o’clock position. Your knee should be completely straight. If your heel has trouble making contact with the pedal, the seat is too high. If your knee is bent it is too low. Make very small adjustments, in millimeters, until your leg is straight with the heel on the pedal.

Adapting to your new saddle height

When you’re done adjusting your saddle height, wrap a strip of electrical tape around the base of the post where it meets the seat clamp. Take measurements and keep them for future reference. Make the first few rides with your new saddle height short and sweet. It can take a few rides before your body fully adapts. It is good to get your bike fit looked at at least every few years or if you get new equipment such as new shoes or pedals. Pro tip: when you’re ready for longer rides, check out these 3 cyclist-friendly routes in Austin.

Solo cyclist rides on the Veloway in Austin, Texas. Text on design reads Cyclist-Friendly Routes in Austin. Learn more at https://captextri.com/cyclist-friendly-routes-in-austin/

3 Cyclist-Friendly Routes in Austin to Ride

Get more comfortable on your bike when you ride these cyclist-friendly routes in Austin

Avoid traffic and become more comfortable on your bike on these cyclist-friendly routes. These 3 Austin spots are located throughout town, making them accessible to many cyclists. They’re ideal for enjoying a scenic route and mastering your bike handling skills. New to cycling or just purchased your first bike? Nice! The more routes you ride, the more familiar you will become with your new bike. If switching gears is new to you, using them can be tricky on your first few rides. Your bike presents a new feel. Leaning into the curves, becoming comfortable with the handling, and eating and drinking on the bike are all things you should practice. Pro tip: always check that your helmet fits before every ride.

Veloway

This 3-mile looped, one-way roadway is an ideal cyclist-friendly route. The Veloway is located in southwest Austin off LaCrosse Avenue and is closed to traffic. Parking is ample. Most noteworthy, this route is strictly for cyclists and rollerbladers, no runners or walkers (watch out for the wildlife!). The roadway is bisected with a continuous white line (slower cyclists keep to the right). Everyone moves in the same clockwise manner. You can relax a little knowing you don’t have to keep an eye out for non-wheeled individuals or riders coming in your direction. There are gorgeous views, a few tight turns, and some nice straightaways. Make sure you get into the right gear for a nice climb around Mile 2! Porta-potties are available.

Southern Walnut Creek Trail

The Southern Walnut Creek Trail begins at Govalle Neighborhood Park off Bolm Road in east Austin. It features nearly 7.5 miles of 10-foot wide concrete paths and splendid views. Like the Veloway, there is plenty of parking. Be advised, runners and walkers are allowed on the trail and traffic flows both ways. Ensure the other lane is clear and yell out “on your left” if you plan to pass others. There are a few road crossings along the trail to be aware of as well. Add 11 miles and some nice climbs to your bike ride when you preview the Rookie Tri and Jack’s Generic Tri bike courses! The trail rides alongside Daffan Lane and eventually hits Decker Lane.

Brushy Creek Regional Trail

Representing north Austin, the Brushy Creek Regional Trail reaches Round Rock to the east and Cedar Park to the west. Check out Stone Canyon Pool if you park to the east. Park to the west at Twin Lakes Family YMCA. Be aware of runners and walkers on this 6.75-mile multi-use trail that connects neighborhoods and existing parks. Traffic flows in both directions and there are multiple restrooms along the trail. Make sure the other lane is clear and yell out “on your left” if you plan to pass others. BCRT images from cedarparktexas.gov.

Two males run on South 1st Street bridge with the Austin skyline in the background during the CapTex Triathlon. Text in design reads 6 Items Every Beginner Triathlete Must Have. Learn more at https://captextri.com/6-items-beginner-triathlete/

6 Items Every Beginner Triathlete Must Have

Every beginner triathlete needs these 6 items before they can train

You’ve decided to start training for your first triathlon, congrats! Now what? Before you get started you’ll need some specific gear for all phases of training. This 6-item checklist is a great start for every beginner triathlete! It’s got you covered from the swim to the bike to the run. You might even have some of these items already. If that’s the case, we’ve added a few more recommendations at the end. Below are the 6 items every beginner triathlete must-have. Pro tip: pair the items with these 8 habits to successfully train and crush it on race day! 

Bike

Infographic listing the 6 items every beginner triathlete must have. List includes bike, helmet, tri shorts, goggles, running shoes, and sports bra. Read more at https://captextri.com/6-items-beginner-triathlete/Any bike. It can be anything from your uncle’s old bike that has been in the garage or the mountain bike you take out riding with your kids. Be sure that the bike is in good repair by taking it to a local shop. If the bike is really old or in disrepair, you may spend just as much on fixing it as you will buying a beginner bike. Pro tip: a road bike with gears will make your training a lot more comfortable. You will be able to go further with less effort and have more “in the tank” when you head out for the run. Remember to practice these 5 bike handling skills.

Helmet

Helmets should be replaced every 5-8 years and definitely after any crash — no matter how small. Helmets provide the same safety level at any price tag so you don’t need anything expensive. The higher-end helmets are equipped with more ventilation and aerodynamics. Some helmets are specifically sized so make sure and check when you purchase. A loose-fitting helmet is not safe. Pro tip: follow these easy steps to ensure your helmet properly fits.

Bike or tri shorts

Really you can wear what you want, just remember that transition is open and there is nowhere to change in private. If you want to be comfortable while training and racing get a nice pair of athletic shorts. These can really be anything but cotton as cotton will not wick away sweat and can lead to chaffing. Ouch! A basic tri short with a little bit of padding will make your bike-riding experience much more enjoyable. The best part is that these shorts will last long after your triathlon debut. They are perfect for cross-training, cycle classes, and even going for runs.

Goggles

There is no perfect goggle since everyone’s face is shaped a little differently. Visit a local swim shop and try on a few models to find what works for you. Leaky goggles will derail your swim and can make swimming a lot more difficult. Especially if you are having to stop and constantly adjust for goggles. Don’t skimp and just buy the cheapest ones at the store. Once you have tested them out a few times, we suggest buying a second pair in a different tint so that you have something for all conditions. Here’s some more advice to follow when searching for your goggles.

Running shoes

If they are comfortable, they are good to go. Even if they are just the shoes you got because you liked the way they looked. Have some shoes that aren’t comfortable? Well, you can still run in those — you will just be, well uncomfortable at the end of your run.

Sports bra

Ladies, even if you decide to use your swimsuit for your first triathlon you are going to want to wear a good sports bra underneath. You will want something you are comfortable running in. If you have some areas that rub, like under the armpits, you can put some Vaseline or Body Glide on in the morning to help with chaffing.

Beginner triathlete extras

Recommended

  • Flat kit – you’ll want this if you get a flat
  • Hat/visor – protect yourself from the sun
  • Water bottle for the bike – stay hydrated
  • Bright towel – find your spot easier in transition
  • Sunscreen – don’t get burnt 
  • Race belt – carry your nutrition and your bib

Optional

  • Socks – keep your feet comfortable
  • Bike shoes with clip-in pedals – make sure you practice first
  • Sports watch – track your time
  • Sunglasses – protect from debris on your ride
  • Transition bag – carry all your stuff
  • Wetsuit – can be expensive, but could help in the water
Male cyclist rides down Congress Avenue during CapTex Tri with the Texas State Capitol in the background. Text in design reads 5 Bike Handling Skills Every Triathlete Should Know. Learn more at https://captextri.com/bike-handling-skills/

5 Bike Handling Skills Every Triathlete Should Know

Why triathletes should focus on bike handling skills

Competency with your bike handling skills gives you a decisive advantage over your competition. You gain the experience, knowledge, and practical ability to bike better and more efficiently. Success at a triathlon depends on how well you can gauge your environment. You’ll be surrounded by people, have to traverse across various kinds of terrain, and your journey will be long. That is why you should be completely comfortable with riding your bike for long hours. Here are five key bike handling skills that will help you become a more successful triathlete.

Pro tip: follow these steps before every ride to ensure your helmet fits.

The skills every triathlete should nail

  • Starting and Stopping

These are the most basic bike skills that you must master. Without having solid control over your bike, you could end up in an accident. If your bike uses clip-on pedals, then you should become familiar with them. Practice clipping and unclipping your pedals while riding until you perfect it.

  • Braking and Corners

Speed isn’t always your best friend when it comes to triathlon. This really applies to corners. Instead of pressing down on the brake once you reach the corner, try slowly braking as you near it. This way, you get time to think about the turn you’ll make and pre-emptively react to any dangers ahead.

  • Bike Handling and Shifting gears

Your timing with gear handling should be impeccable. You can achieve this by spending as much time riding on the roads as you can. The natural environment will teach you how to gauge the timing of your shifting. Once you develop this skill, you’ll begin to shift your gears more naturally as you get to your location.

  • Know your Cadence

The cadence in a bike is the number of times you can pedal per minute. Cadence is also known as pedaling rate. Triathletes should be able to maintain a consistent pedaling rate between 90-100 revolutions per minute. By practicing every day, you should be able to get to this level.

  • Drinking while biking

If you’re going to compete in a triathlon, your nutritional intake should be right. You don’t want to get dehydrated during the event nor do you want to feel anything less than your best. That is why you should practice grabbing your water bottle while your biking. You can do this by biking slowly at first, as you reach to your water bottle holder to grab the bottle, drink from it, and place it back. Over time, you will gain the confidence to do this with ease. Pro tip: you will spill and your bike will get dirty. Take the time to clean it with these simple steps!

These basic bike handling skills will take you from a cyclist to a real competitor. You need more than a better bike to succeed at triathlon. Developing your skills is what will help you achieve success. If you’re in the market for a new bike, make sure you know the differences between triathlon and road bikes.

Female runner completes the final leg of the 2019 CapTex Tri on the South 1st Street Bridge. Text in design reads habits of a successful triathlete. Read the habits at https://captextri.com/habits-of-a-successful-triathlete/

Habits of a Successful Triathlete

Become a successful triathlete when you practice these 8 habits

To be a triathlete you need to have the basics of swimming, biking, and running down. But to become a successful triathlete (whatever that means to you/ whatever your goals may be) there are some other lifestyle changes you can make to really be successful. There are a few habits you can adopt to help you get there that already line up with your goals. Keep reading to discover the habits successful triathletes have in common.

Do your research/PREPARE

Find the right race for you. If you’re new to the sport, don’t go for a longer distance tri. Start slow and build your way up to your desired event distance. Will you need a wetsuit? Is your race even wetsuit legal? What are the benefits of a race being USAT certified? There’s a lot to learn, like knowing the difference between triathlon and road bikes. Proper preparation can reduce unexpected surprises that may come your way during training or on race day. 

Pace yourself

Don’t go full force when you’re first training or just getting back into training after offseason. Find a training plan and follow that as your guide. Be willing to make training tweaks if needed.

Know how to fuel

Nutrition during training and during the race has a huge impact on the way you can expect to perform come race day. Make sure you’re following the right nutrition plan for your body and the event distance you signed up for. 

Give Your Gear the TLC it needs

Take care of the gear that takes care of you. Follow instructions for proper care and give your bike frequent tune-ups to maximize performance. Clean gear is happy gear!

Know what you can control

You’ve done everything you can to make sure this race goes perfectly. You did a gear check, you packed the perfect race day bag and you’re ready to go! Then a storm hits. Don’t let this get you down or let you feel defeated before the race even starts. You know you’ve spent the time training and just remember to focus on what you can control for a good race. All the other athletes there are experiencing the exact same thing. Pre-race jitters are real and they can throw even the best athletes off track. If you know your jitters on race morning are going to be bad, work on a couple of exercises or something to help you distract yourself from the nerves on race morning. We see this all the time and its a really great way to center yourself before starting the swim!  

REST!

Take some time off when you need it! Listen to what your body is telling you so you don’t overdo it and risk an injury. 

Enjoy healthy food

Switching up your diet for healthier options is a really simple yet effective way to help you during your training. Of course, you don’t have to stop eating what you really love, but adjusting to a cleaner, healthier lifestyle is great for maintaining energy during workouts as well as leaving you feeling good too. 

Successful triathletes stay in the moment

Take it one day at a time. Everyone has good days and bad days and training for a triathlon is no exception. Remember why you started this journey or what inspired you to and focus on that when you’re having a tough day. Be kind to yourself and find ways to keep yourself motivated to reach the goal of crossing that finish line!

man swim bike and run for motivational triathlon backgrounds to keep you motivated.

Free Motivational Phone Backgrounds for Triathletes

Get ready to get inspired by these motivational backgrounds!

Do you find yourself thinking “I’ll just work out tomorrow” or putting off fixing the flat on your bike? When exhaustion sets in, maintaining that motivation to keep up with your fitness routine can be tough. Now is the time for action and we have just the thing for you.

There’s something about an inspirational quote/phrase/saying that will really get you back on track when you are unmotivated.  Whether you’re battling with stress or lack of motivation, an inspiring wallpaper or background is a great way to give you the extra boost you need to complete a workout. 

Here are some of our favorite inspirational sayings that never fail to keep us taking another step forward whenever our body is fighting us. Be inspired and get motivated to keep being the awesome triathlete you are.

These motivational wallpapers will be there to help you stay active and help motivate you to keep training and believing in yourself!

Right click to save the image and set it as your phone background or lock screen.

Motivational Triathlon Wallpaper Background for iphones CapTex Tri Austin, Texas Motivational Triathlon Wallpaper Background for iphones CapTex Tri Austin, Texas Motivational Triathlon Wallpaper Background for iphones CapTex Tri Austin, Texas Motivation Quote Triathlon Instagram Stories CapTex Tri Motivational Backgrounds CapTex Tri Motivational Background with cyclist CapTex Tri Motivational Background with cyclist CapTex Tri Motivational Background with cyclist CapTex Tri Motivational Background with swimmer Yesterday I dared to struggle, today I dared to win.

Get motivated, anywhere, anytime all at your fingertips with our motivational backgrounds.

  1. You only regret the workouts you don’t do.
  2. Yesterday I dared to struggle, today I dared to win.
  3. Don’t stop when you’re tired, stop when you’re done. 
  4. A journey of a thousand miles begins with one step
  5. It pains me to continue, but it hurts much worse to stop.
  6. All it takes is all you got.
  7. Others make excuses to quit. You make excuses to keep going. 
  8. Swim fast. Cycle strong. Run to win. 
  9. Triathletes aren’t born. They’re made.
  10. Swim. Bike. Run.

Share your Motivation

We are feeling motivated just writing this blog! Now before you run out the door to log some miles be sure to give yourself time to warm up. Starting off too quick can lead to injury and nobody wants that!

Do you have a favorite motivational quote? Share them with us and your fellow athletes in the community on our Facebook page or tag us on Instagram!

Woman buying helmet and checking the fit for safety

Easy Steps to Check Your Helmets Fit

Get the right fit and know that your helmet is fully protecting you

An unexpected fall from a bike can happen at any time with the potential to result in brain injury. The good news is that a properly-fitted helmet will reduce this risk. 

Helmets come in a variety of sizes depending on the manufacturer. Even though they are sized they will come with a fine-tuning dial so that you can adjust the helmet to fit your head specifically. Take the time to check your helmet before every ride. Your life is worth it and could depend on how your helmet is set up. Use these tips on how to make sure you have the right fit for your bike helmet. 

Size

The first thing you should adjust when choosing a helmet is the fit pads or adjuster ring. The helmet needs to be snug around your head to effectively protect you. It should not be too tight where you feel pressure and not too loose that there is any wiggle room. It should not be able to move from side to side or slip back off your forehead. If needed, add more fit pads to get a secure fit. If your helmet has an adjuster ring, modify the circumference until the helmet is fitted properly for your head. 

Positioning

The next thing to determine is how high the helmet should sit on your head to protect your head on all sides, in case of a fall. Two finger-widths should be visible on your forehead. You can also decide if your helmet fits properly by looking up. You should be able to see the rim or front edge of the helmet when you do so without interfering with your vision.

Pro tip: you should always wear protective lenses with your helmet, so make sure there is enough room to wear them both comfortably.

Straps

Cyclist wearing a helmet properly with instructions to check proper helmet fit for saftyTo keep the helmet in place, the next step is ensuring the chin straps are long enough to reach under your chin and can be tightened securely. This part is especially important because you do not want to be dealing with an ill-fitting helmet during your next tri. 

The “Y” shaped strap needs to fit under your ears comfortably and buckle under your chin without being too tight. Your helmet should not be able to move more than an inch in any direction. After you buckle the chin strap, it should be secured in the correct position.  You should not be able to fit more than one finger under the chin.

These straps can sometimes loosen with time so it is important to check your helmets fit before each ride. 

Comfort

While comfort is not a safety feature in itself, having a helmet that you find comfortable will mean that you wear it more often. While every helmet is the same safety rating, you will find more expensive helmets have more vents. If you have long rides planned during hot weather, having these extra vents to cool you off might make you more comfortable. 

Bicycle helmets only work if you wear them correctly. Helmets should always be replaced if they are in a crash. Yes, even if it is a “small one”, if your helmet makes any contact it could be compromised and should be replaced.

If you’re riding alone or going on a group ride, use these tips when shopping around for your next helmet to make sure you are as safe as possible on your future rides.

Checking your helmet fit for safety:

  1. The helmet is the proper size
  2. Fit is comfortable to be worn for long periods of time
  3. The helmet is snugly fit and cannot be moved more than 1 inch in any direction
  4. The helmet is no more than 2 fingers above the eyebrows. 
  5. Chin straps are tight with no more than one finger width under your chin.
  6. Side buckles are fastened just slightly in front of and below the ears. 
10 Fun Facts You Need to Know About Triathlon

10 Fun Facts You Need to Know About Triathlon

10 Fun Facts You Never Knew About the Sport of Triathlon!

Triathlon is a complex sport that consists of swimming, biking, and running. While there is a lot of technical aspects to know about triathlon, there’s a lot of fun stuff too! We love everything there is about triathlon. From selecting the race and choosing the right distance, to the preparation and training. Trying to take all that in can be overwhelming, so let’s start with some of the fun stuff. Expand your knowledge of triathlon and keep reading to see 10 fun facts about triathlon you maybe didn’t know!

Check Out These Fun Facts

  1. It is not uncommon for triathletes to burn up to 10,000 calories during a long-distance race. 
  2. In triathlon every second counts, for that reason, many athletes pee while they are on the bike, or even on the run. 
  3. The first triathlon event was held on September 25, 1974. 
  4. Simon Lessings holds the Olympic distance triathlon world record with a time of 1 hour, 39 minutes, 50 seconds. That’s fast. 
  5. Triathlon was designed to be an alternative to hard track training.
  6. The reason why the order of the disciplines is swim, bike, run is for safety concerns. 
  7. The Olympic distance tri was originally called the international distance. 
  8. The oldest triathlete on record is Arthur Gilbert, who was still competing at the age of 93. 
  9. Drafting, riding in close behind the rider before you to reduce wind resistance, is not allowed during the cycling part of a triathlon. If you get caught you face a penalty including disqualification. 
  10. Triathlon made its Olympic debut at the 2000 Sydney Games.

The world of triathlon is certainly an interesting one and has evolved greatly overtime with new people joining the fun each year. If you’re new to the sport and thinking about doing a triathlon yourself, check out these essential race day tips to help as you train and prepare for your first triathlon. Now that you know some of the fun triathlon facts, be sure to share it with your fellow triathletes on Facebook or Twitter.

6 Things to Keep In Mind for Olympic Distance Triathlons

Going The Distance: What to Keep In Mind When Going From Sprint to Olympic

So you have completed a Sprint Triathlon and now you’re looking for the next challenge. You can always do more sprint triathlons and work on increasing your speed or you can work on your endurance and increase your distance. Maybe going up to the next distance is your goal. For those looking to go long, here are some simple training reminders and workout tips to help you conquer the Olympic distance tri at CapTex Tri.

6 Tips for Olympic Distance Triathlons

1. Not Always Easy

First, it is important to remember that part of the appeal of racing an Olympic distance is that it is not exactly easy.  Simply doubling your workouts isn’t going to cut it. In training, have a goal of completing 60-80% of the segment distance before the event. 

2. Find Your Pace

With a sprint, you could go all out but you will probably not able to keep this same pace in the Olympic distance tri. Train at a pace that you are comfortable with so that you do not burn out on race day. Start thinking of speed versus endurance.

3. Calories Matter

Third, Calories Calories Calories. These longer distances are going to require fueling. Test several products before committing, just because something works for your friend or someone at the gym, it doesn’t mean that it is right for you.

4. Preparation is Key

Fourth, take “Nothing New on Race Day” to the next level. Make sure you have tried everything at least 3 times before you arrive race morning. We are talking socks, shoes, hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, nutrition, which water bottle, ev-er-y-thing. 

5. When in Doubt, Swim

Fifth, if you have time for an extra workout – choose the pool. Swimming is great aerobics and can lead to gains on the bike and the run. Efficiency in the swim can leave you with more energy instead of being taxed right out of the water. More important than hours logged, make sure that you are making each workout count.

6. Find A Balance

Sixth, keep balance. Make sure to find time for friends and family. Many of them may not understand but make sure and thank them for being there to support you in any way. Make sure and inform them when, where, and how long you are going out for a long run or bike. A safety post on Facebook is a good idea as well and a fun way to let everyone know how your training is going. 

6 tips for going from sprint to olympic distance triathlonAdditional Tips

  • Every other week make one of your run workouts follows immediately after your bike workout. 
  • Switch it up. Don’t always do the same style work out on the same day of the week.
  • Have Fun and Smile!

 

Go The Distance!

These 6 easy steps are your guide to getting to the start line with a high level of confidence so that you are ready to be successful for your first Olympic distance triathlon! Also, remember that no matter the distance increase it is important to keep your ultimate end goal in mind and then set up milestones that you can meet along the way.

Training Tweaks to Improve Your Run Performance

Training Tweaks to Improve Your Run Performance

Improve your run performance for your next tri

If you’re looking to improve your overall endurance when it comes to running, you’ve come to the right place. In this blog, we’ll discuss a few ways to improve your run performance for your upcoming triathlon. 

Adjust Your Current Running Plan

Start by evaluating your current running abilities to establish your starting point and work from there. Then, you can determine how you will need to make adjustments to your run training. No matter how seasoned you are as a triathlete, preparation for the run leg is very similar. The most notable difference in advanced triathletes and new triathletes is the distance and duration of the runs. If you’re new to running or just got into running, try a high-intensity run to test your endurance capacity. Try to keep your pace consistent when doing so. Keep track of how long you were able to run at that pace without becoming fatigued. This is your starting point.

Improve Your Endurance

For beginners, maintaining the right pace for extended periods can be tough. We see this when athletes start too fast and fade at the end during a workout. An excellent way to learn how to maintain a new, faster pace is to do track-type workouts on a treadmill. Treadmill sessions are good for this because you’ll become used to holding your pace while dealing with fatigue. Short intervals on a treadmill while adjusting the incline can lead to an increase in your pace and speed without having to exert a ton of energy. This will especially help if your triathlon run has a hilly run course. During this time of focusing on your run, increase the number of run workouts you do in a week. Pro tip: be sure you’re warming up and cooling down for each session for the maximum payoff!

Get Used to Running on Tired LegsRunning on tired legs

Improve your run by incorporating brick workouts into your training and get out for a longer, more challenging run than usual after hard swimming or cycling sessions. Completing swimming or cycling workouts back to back with a run workout will help to familiarize your body with the movement patterns and expectations you’ll need for the day of your race. Because the run is the last leg of the tri, it’s important that you get used to running on tired legs.

Takeaway

Once you have mastered the running basics and established a starting point, you’ll start seeing improvements. Integrating these tips will likely increase your resistance to fatigue and improve your ability to run for longer periods of time at a steady pace. These tips are useful to triathletes because completing better quality speed training will lead to faster run time, and overall finishing time. With thought and planning, now is the perfect time to improve your triathlon run performance like never before.