How Many Calories are Burned During a Sprint Triathlon?

Understand your body’s needs when you know how many calories are burned during a sprint triathlon

Triathlon is among the most physically demanding and grueling sports. The race is divided into three parts – cycling, swimming, and running. Sprint triathlon is the shortest of all triathlon distances and a great way for new triathletes to enter the sport. CapTex Triathlon’s sprint distance includes a 750m swim, 12.3-mile bike ride, and 5K run. Those are also typical of other sprint distances. While sprint distances are shorter, you still have to properly fuel your body. Proper nutrition is important no matter the distance. In order to know what your body needs, you have to understand how many calories are burned during a sprint triathlon.

Keep in mind that everyone burns calories at different rates. This is meant to be a general guide to understanding your needs. Here’s some more helpful information on what to expect at your first triathlon.

Pro tip: this information can be useful if you’re participating in The Rookie Triathlon’s super sprint distance. It consists of a 300m swim 11-mile ride, and 2-mile run.

Calories burned

For triathletes, several factors play a role in how many calories are burned during a race. The three biggest contributors are bodyweight, distance covered, and pace during the event. The majority of charts will have a ‘calories burned’ per time segment/per round, keeping in mind your body weight. The calorie values typically include the individual’s basal metabolic rate (BMR).

For a 750m swim, a person weighing 150 pounds would burn approximately 682 calories each hour. The sprint typically takes up to 20 minutes, so the total would be around 85 to 227.

It takes about 38 minutes to complete the 12.3-mile bike ride. For a person that weighs 150 pounds, the calories burned covering this distance would be around 682. A person weighing 120 pounds would burn around 545. Pro tip: safely practice eating and drinking on the bike and avoid traffic at these 3 cyclist-friendly Austin locations.

A 5K run usually takes 45 minutes for an average triathlete to complete. When you run at this particular pace, you burn up to 15 calories a minute. This equates to approximately 675 calories. That amount could increase for triathletes that run faster.

Things to keep in mind

If this is your first time training for a triathlon, you might notice a rise in your regular appetite. This will typically happen in the first few weeks of training and workouts. Why does this happen? An increase in appetite results from the body burning a greater number of calories than normal. However, when you’re training for your sprint triathlon make sure you don’t overeat. This will undo the benefits of your daily workouts. There are workout calculators that you can use to track the number of calories burned and monitor your calorie consumption. These aspects are critical for maintaining your weight goals. Additionally, practice these habits of successful triathletes to crush your training and hit your goals!

6 Ways to Increase Your Bike Mileage

Achieve your larger goals with this advice on how to increase your bike mileage

Cycling is fun. The wind is blowing in your face and you’re generating your own power. Naturally, we want to go further and further, push the boundaries. Testing ourselves is one way to build our self-esteem and learn about mental fortitude. Setting a bigger goal can be overwhelming when you look at the goal by itself. Follow our guide for the best way to increase your bike mileage. You’ll grow as a cyclist, reduce the chance of injury, and work towards your big goal! Pro tip: if you’re just getting started, avoid the roads and ride on these cyclist-friendly routes.

Do the work

Cyclists cross the South 1st Street bridge during the CapTex Tri.This is self-explanatory! Whether it’s a rest day or your longest ride ever, you have to do the work. You don’t need to set records every time, but you do need to be consistent. That’s how you’ll build your stamina and teach your body to ride further and further. If there’s a day where you just can’t squeeze in a ride or workout (because life happens), don’t stress. Don’t try to make it up the next day. Squeeze in a foam roll or stretch session if you can and keep moving forward with your plan! Make sure you practice these 5 bike handling skills every time you ride.

REST

If your training plan calls for a rest day, TAKE THE REST DAY. This allows your body the chance to recover from the previous workout. If you get the itch to do something, make it active recovery. Foam roll throughout the day. Set aside time for deep stretching. Take an online yoga class. Those three options will speed up the recovery process and get you ready for the next day. Pro tip: successful triathletes take advantage of rest days. Check out 7 more habits of successful triathletes.

Increase your stamina

Cyclist rides on a stretch of Cesar Chavez Street during the CapTex Tri.As you increase your bike mileage, you begin to get comfortable with being uncomfortable. Weekend rides begin to get longer and longer. As you hit new distances, it’s important to remain focused on form and technique. You want to remain as efficient as possible. Focusing on your form will allow you to generate power efficiently. This will also help with your body’s ability to consume oxygen.

You want to ease into your ride to conserve energy. Start at a pace that feels effortless. You should be able to have a conversation. As you ride, you’ll eventually pick up speed to help with your stamina later in the ride.

Build lower body strength

You’ll need to prepare your body for completing your bigger goals. Break up rides with weight workouts. You don’t need to become chiseled or gain muscle mass. Focus on lighter weights with higher repetitions. You want to push the body, burn fat, and build lean muscle. Working muscles differently than when you’re cycling is critical. It helps prevent the overuse of the same muscles.

Plan your route

Before your long ride, make sure you have a plan. You should ride as consistently as possible to build your stamina. Planning your route reduces the chance you have to stop and check where you are or ask for directions. For longer rides, planning your route allows you to refuel at a gas station pitstop. You can grab a bite to eat, rest for a minute, and use the restroom. Continue to refuel during your ride, topping off with a few hundred calories every hour. Lastly, let someone know your planned route and when you should return.

Set smaller goals

On your next long ride, push yourself to ride further than you did last weekend. When preparing to increase your mileage, you need to slowly teach your body that it’s capable of completing longer distances. You’ll eventually see that last week’s distance that was difficult is now easier. Slowly but surely increasing your mileage will put you in a prime position to really crush longer and longer distances. Pro tip: stay motivated and reward yourself when you complete the smaller goals you set.

There are many other factors that can impact how you increase your bike mileage: diet, hydration, nutrition, cross-training, injuries, etc. Those items can be built-in or dealt with as you progress. Just remember, you don’t just wake up and ride these longer distances. This will take time, persistence, consistency. Do the work, set smaller goals, rest when you’re supposed to, and you will achieve whatever goals are in front of you! Stay safe and follow the cycling rules of the road.